“Trying to Build in the Rubble of Neoliberalism”: Michelle Alexander and Naomi Klein on Bringing Movements Together

“On Tuesday, May 9, Haymarket Books hosted a conversation between Michelle Alexander and Naomi Klein, moderated by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, in front of a sold-out crowd of 3,000 at Chicago’s Auditorium Theatre. In this, the final part of the transcript of that conversation (lightly edited for length and clarity), the three women discuss movement-building, the need to write “people’s platforms” and not to rely on candidates, and their hopes and fears for resistance to the Trump regime. Read part one here and part two here.”

How do we envision the movements necessary to get beyond the existential threats to the planet and its people?

Source: “Trying to Build in the Rubble of Neoliberalism”: Michelle Alexander and Naomi Klein on Bringing Movements Together

blivet – 5/30/2001

Give Me a Hug: When Multinationals Want to Be Our Friend
by Naomi Klein at the Globe & Mail. via wood s lot. this brought me up short and captured my attention – I’ve used the same quote in the (vain) hope of achieving the same effect:

…it’s one of the ironies of our branded age that, as corporations become more remote by cutting lasting ties with us as their employees, they are increasingly sidling up to us as consumers, whispering sweet nothings in our ear about friendship and community. It’s not just Shoppers: Wal-Mart ads tell stories about clerks who, in a pinch, lend customers their own wedding gowns, and Saturn ads are populated by car dealers who offer counselling [sic –ed.] when customers lose their jobs. You see, according to the new marketing book, Values Added, modern marketers have to “make your brand a cause and your cause a brand.”(…)

Ever since large corporations such as Nike, Shell and Monsanto began facing increased scrutiny from civil society — mostly for putting short-term profits far ahead of environmental responsibility and job security — an industry has ballooned to help these companies respond. It seems clear, however, that many in the corporate world remain utterly convinced that all they have is a “messaging problem,” one that can be neatly solved by settling on the right, socially minded brand identity.(…)

Nothing will change until corporations realize that they don’t have a communications problem. They have a reality problem.

While you’re at it, don’t miss Toxic Culture Syndrome– by Kalle Lasn, also at the Globe & Mail.

garret news: “for those who have a lack of ‘danger’ in their lives, maybe this will suffice until things get straightened out.” His discussion group and image galleries are accessible, but no archives at the present time. By all means check out herodotus.

Thanks for the linkage Dori!

Friday marks a major career and personal milestone for a friend, Dave Rogers. I’ve been reading your writing for some time Dave, I wish you the best. Hey! My copy of Photoshop doesn’t have the George Clooney or liposuction filters either! What’s going on here?

Good Morning. I think it’s morning anyway. I’m running late – updates will follow uh…, later.