Goodbye, Facebook…

Sensing the ‘net, garret signal boosted Kevin Bankston’s post: Want to stop info of yours from going out over Facebook’s API? and I followed the instructions therein.

By opting out of Facebook’s The Platform I can no longer share my blog posts as a Facebook posting. After a bit, I decided that was just fine.

“So I got that goin’ for me, which is nice” —Carl Spangler Caddyshack

Buddhist Thought for the Day

The purpose of a fish trap is to catch fish,
and when the fish are caught, the trap is forgotten.
The purpose of a rabbit snare is to catch rabbits.
When the rabbits are caught, the snare is forgotten.
The purpose of words is to convey ideas.
When the ideas are grasped, the words are forgotten.
Where can I find a man who has forgotten words?
He is the one I would like to talk to.
–Chuang Tzu

Arthur C. Clarke, R.I.P.

My God. It’s full of stars!

The man who was the father of a thousand dreams, has died in his beloved, adopted Sri Lanka. Arthur C. Clarke was 90.

The Clarke Belt. Childhood’s End. 2001: A Space Odyssey. Too many stories, novellas and books to recall… There’s not a geek alive who does not have their own list of favorites.

All these worlds are yours, except Europa. Attempt no landings there.

Sigh. You will come close to immortality through your works.

You’re the star child now. Thank you, Mr. Clark.

Kurt is up in heaven now

From A Man Without A Country (2005):

I am, incidentally, Honorary President of the American Humanist Association, having succeeded the late, great Isaac Asimov in that totally functionless capacity. We had a memorial service for Isaac a few years back, and I spoke and said at one point, “Isaac is up in heaven now.” It was the funniest thing I could have said to an audience of humanists. I rolled them in the aisles. It was several minutes before order could be restored. And if I should die, God forbid, I hope you will say, “Kurt is up in heaven now.” That’s my favorite joke.

Neoconservatives, Teddy Roosevelt and Treason

I seldom managed to keep up with Glenn Greenwald’s writings over at Unclaimed Territory, though I meant to. Now that he is a regular at Salon.com. I manage to keep up. Today Greenwald takes up the neoconservative drumbeat that anti-war sentiments constitute treason. Between him and Dave Neiwert writing about eliminationism in America I’m starting to think these neoconservatives are, well, holding mistaken beliefs.

Having written all that, I really liked this from Greenwald today:

excerpt from Neoconservatives hate liberty as much as they love war
The following observation is from Theodore Roosevelt, written in the middle of World War I, as part of a 1918 Op-Ed for The Kansas City Star. It couldn’t be more applicable to the Bush movement and to the accompanying neonconservative belief that anti-war sentiments constitute treason:

The President is merely the most important among a large number of public servants. He should be supported or opposed exactly to the degree which is warranted by his good conduct or bad conduct, his efficiency or inefficiency in rendering loyal, able, and disinterested service to the Nation as a whole.

Therefore it is absolutely necessary that there should be full liberty to tell the truth about his acts, and this means that it is exactly necessary to blame him when he does wrong as to praise him when he does right. Any other attitude in an American citizen is both base and servile.

To announce that there must be no criticism of the President, or that we are to stand by the President, right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public. Nothing but the truth should be spoken about him or any one else. But it is even more important to tell the truth, pleasant or unpleasant, about him than about any one else. [emphasis added]

links for 2006-09-06

Carl Sagan Quote

Those afraid of the universe as it really is, those who pretend to nonexistent knowledge and envision a Cosmos centered on human beings will prefer the fleeting comforts of superstition. They avoid rather than confront the world. But those with the courage to explore the weave and structure of the Cosmos, even where it differs profoundly from their wishes and prejudices, will penetrate its deepest mysteries.
–Carl Sagan